What's new?

  • 2014: The MAterials Simulation Toolkit (MAST) goes online: Download code; The MAST manual
  • Aug, 2014: University of Wisconsin and Argonne National Laboratory researchers combine computation and in-situ synchrotron characterization to gain new understanding of layered oxide growth - please see the recent paper in Nature Materials.
  • May, 2014: Prof. Izabela Szlufarska and Prof. Dane Morgan have been both promoted to positions of full professors. Congratulations!
  • May, 2014: Congratulations to Wei Xie for winning the David Turnbull Memorial Graduate Student Awards.
  • April, 2014: Congratulations to Zhizhang Shen for receiving the Bailey Distinguished Graduate Fellowship. This fellowship is given by the Department of Geoscience to an outstanding student who shows great potential and is deserving of special encouragement and recognition.
  • April, 2014: Congratulations to Prof. Izabela Szlufarska for winning the H. I. Romnes Faculty Fellowship. The Romnes awards are given by the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation (WARF) and they recognize exceptional faculty members who have earned tenure within the last six years.
  • March, 2014: The new CMG web page went online
  • Feb., 2014: Open postdoctoral positions in modeling of nuclear materials
  • Feb., 2014: Professor Dane Morgan wins the Vilas Associate Award
  • July, 2013: Ming-Jie won the first prize for a poster competition in the CASL Education Program Summer Student Workshop 2013. Congratulations!
  • June, 2013: Congratulations to Wei Xie for receiving CALPHAD Scholarship awarded by CALPHAD. Inc. as one of the ten recipients worldwide in 2013
  • June, 2013: Dane Morgan is the co-director of the Wisconsin Materials Innovation Institute (WIMII)
  • June, 2013: Big congratulations to CMG alumnus Dr. Yifei Mo on his new job as an Assistant Professor at the University of Maryland!
  • June, 2013: Dr. Alejandro Londono got his new job at 3M as a Polymer Modeling Engineer. Congratulations!
  • May, 2013: CMG members participated in the Workshop on Cyberinfrastructure
  • April, 2013: CMG members in Engineering Expo 2013

See older CMG announcements

 


About us

The Computational Materials Group (CMG) at UW uses atomic scale modeling to understand and design new materials. We employ highly accurate ab initio (first-principles) techniques to study electronic structure and energetics of smaller systems, and interatomic potential modeling on massively parallel computers to study up to hundreds of millions of atoms. These core approaches are combined with a wide-range of other atomistic methods, including Monte Carlo, coarse graining, data mining, thermodynamics, and statistical physics. These tools allow us to look deeply and quantitatively at materials phenomena over an extensive range of time and length scales. Currently, we have two grad students who also do experiments.